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3 project management mistakes you can't afford to make

You're probably aware of the biggest project management problems - going over budget, missing your deadline, or a finished product that falls short of expectations. But here are three less-obvious problems that can cast just as much doom and gloom on your company projects.
When it comes to problems with your project management, you've probably thought of the big ones -- like going over budget, missing your deadline, or coming up with a finished product that falls way short of your client's expectations.

But there are three less-obvious problems that can cast just as much doom and gloom on your projects:

1.  Blurry Vision

Every time your company starts a new project, everyone gets a vision in their head of what the finished product will look like.  Your job is to make sure that everyone is on the same page -- from the CEO, all the way down to the interns who fetch your coffee.  After all, if you don't have a shared goal, your odds of actually achieving it are slim! 

And, more importantly, when everyone is working towards the same exact thing, it makes everything feel like much more of a team effort -- which will give everyone a whole lot more satisfaction in the end.  Now THAT'S powerful project management!


2.  Poor Communication

Your marriage won't survive without a healthy dose of communication, and neither will your projects.  Sure, your planning software gives you a bird's eye view of everything, but if you have a question or a concern, get up and go talk to someone about it.  Hashing out differences or getting confusion cleared up face-to-face will leave everyone better off in the end.


3.  Missing Recognition

Speaking of the end, your communication shouldn't stop when your part of the project is finished.  For example, if you're in the IT department -- and your part of the project is done -- be sure to give the marketing department kudos when they tie everything together later.

If you REALLY want to have a successful company, make sure that everyone gives everyone else credit for a job well-done -- not just the people they're directly in charge of.